Purim Megillah readings in North Jersey 2016

Purim sameach! Book of Esther Megillah readings for Northern New Jersey, Purim 2016:

Megillah scroll
Source: The Washington Megillah (Megillat Esther, The Book of Esther), Scroll on Parchment, Illuminated, Italy eighteenth century Hebraic Section. Library of Congress Photo

Megillah Readings Wednesday night 23 March 2016

7:20pm Arzei Darom, Teaneck
7:40pm Anshei Lubavitch, Fair Lawn
7:40pm Teaneck Jewish Center – Pressburger Regular Megillah Reading
7:40pm Teaneck Jewish Center – Library Quiet Megillah Reading
7:50pm Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
8:00pm Zichron Mordechai
8:00pm Zichron Mordechai
8:15pm Teaneck Women’s Tefillah Email
9:00pm Arzei Darom, Teaneck
9:15pm Darchei Noam, Fair Lawn
9:30pm Keter Torah, Teaneck
Bnai Yeshurun
9:45pm Beth Aaron, Teaneck
9:45pm Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
10:00pm Anshei Lubavitch, Fair Lawn

Megillah Readings Thursday, 24 March 2016

5:55am Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
6:40am Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
7:30am Teaneck Jewish Center
8:10am Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
8:30am Anshei Lubavitch, Fair Lawn
9:25am Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
9:45am Paterson Federation Building (and special event*) Contact JerrySchranz@gmail.com
11:00am Teaneck Jewish Center – Women’s Reading in Stein Contact Judi Resnick
2:00pm Anshei Lubavitch, Fair Lawn

Shuls/Reading Locations

  • Paterson Shul at Federation Apartments, Basement: 510 E 27 St, Paterson, New Jersey
  • Teaneck Women’s Tefillah: 595 Wyndham Road, Teaneck.

More Megillah readings and special Purim events

  • Chabad Megillah Readings list
  • Paterson Federation Building Megillah Reading and Light Breakfast
    Learn more about the last of the Jews of Paterson and enjoy a light breakfast/seudah with these seniors, so come with costume, come with ruach! Parking is available on the street and just across the street at Rosa Parks School (former Yavneh Academy)

Tzedaka

  • Grogger meets Tzedaka via yardkay@yahoo.com
    7th grade volunteers from Yeshivat Noam are running a PASTA GROGGER DRIVE this Purim! We are asking families to bring pasta boxes to shake as groggers in shul and then donate them in their shul’s drop-box. These pasta boxes will then be distributed by the 7th grade volunteers to Tomchei Shabbos and The Jewish Federation March Mega Food Drive. Participating shuls include: Congregation Keter Torah, Congregation Rinat Yisrael, Congregation Bnai Yeshurun, Young Israel of Teaneck, Congregation Beth Abraham, Congregation Shaarei Tefilah, Congregation Ohr Hatorah, Congregation Beth Aaron & Congregation Shomrei Torah of Fair Lawn. This is a great way to add more mitzvot, meaning and purpose to all of your family’s Purim holiday fun this year!

    Food may be deposited at two locations directly inside the PODS:

    • Teaneck: 1212 Kensington Road from March 25th until Friday April 8th
    • Englewood: 160 Lyman Place from March 24th until Wednesday March 30th
    • Food may also be dropped off 777 Dearborn Ave., Teaneck until April 5th.

    Food must be in its original packaging, with kosher certification visible. Please do not leave items such as fresh fruit, loose hamentaschen, baked goods, candy no longer in the original package, or foods requiring refrigeration. For more information about the project and donation opportunities to help defray costs, please visit our website or contact Josh Klavan (917) 593-9290, Yoni Lieber (201) 362-3845 or Jason Teigman (201) 321-­1785.

Hundreds of Jews break the sanctity of the Sabbath to save a life – that couldn’t be saved

Deborah Stubin missing flyer
Source: Passaic Police Department

The Daily Mail covers the discovery of Devorah Stubin’s car and body: a 22 year old woman who suffered from occasional seizures and became lost in Maywood, NJ last Thursday night after exiting the Garden State Parkway. NJ.com reports on the community turn-out to search for Devorah and bring her home:

Hundreds of members of the Orthodox Jewish community from around the tri-state area flocked to Passaic Friday as news surfaced of the missing 22-year-old.

“It’s amazing how many people gave up their Sabbath to come help in the search,” said Leat Kuzinar, a family friend. “There were 200 to 300 people, more than what we needed.”

On Saturday Wallington police said a car found submerged in the water matched the description and license plate of Stubin’s, who was driving a gray, four-door 1998 Mitsubishi Galant.

On Sunday, authorities confirmed the body had been identified as Stubin.

Rabbi Ron Yitzchok Eisenman of Congregation Ahavas Israel in Passaic, NJ writes:

Today is Motzei Shabbos the 6th of Shevat 5776 and January 16, 2016

True Chessed

Shocked, stunned, numbed, and speechless; these are just a few of the words which describe our feelings this Motzei Shabbos.

As Shabbos came to a close all of us were informed that the massive search for the safe return of Devorah bas Shoshanah Rus and the Tefillos which were being said on her behalf have been halted.

As Shabbos ended the news travelled quickly that Devorah Stubin was not coming home.

Our hopes for her safe return were dashed as news of her demise was quickly disseminated in the Jewish world and beyond.

Plans for a celebration when she would be found were now replaced with arraignments for a funeral.

I did not know Devorah bas Shoshanah Rus; many who did tell me she was indeed a special Neshama.

I did not know her; however, I do know many of those who sacrificed Shabbos with their families to spend Shabbos in Maywood, New Jersey in the cold and in the rain.

Jews from Brooklyn, Lakewood, Monsey, Teaneck, Elizabeth, Passaic, Clifton and other places all joined together through their hearts and hands left the comfort of their homes and their families to search and attempt to find a young woman whom they never had met.

They survived on an hour of sleep here and there and on high energy caffeinated beverages throughout the day.

They did not care about hot Chulent or warm beds; they did not think about what Shul they should go to or not go to; their focus was singularly on the finding of Devorah bas Shoshanah Rus.

No one cared if you were Chassidish or Litvish, Modern or Open Orthodox; if you wear a hat or if you wife wears a Shaitel or a Tichel, all they cared about was Devorah bas Shoshanah Rus.

Dozens and dozens and volunteers left their warm beds this Shabbos to help find a young woman whose name most had never heard of before Thursday evening.

The togetherness and the unity allow me to feel consoled and that is good.

The outcome was not what he davened or hoped for; however, the display of unity is what we daven for.

I was privileged to count among the many volunteers who gave up their Shabbos for Devorah’s sake two of my own sons.

Both of them spent hours and hours searching and looking for Devorah bas Shoshanah Rus.

This morning at 7 o’clock my son and I left the house together.

He was on his to search for Devorah and I was on my way to search for Hashem.

Before I headed to Shul I walked him to his car.

I proudly stood by as he entered the car and gave him a brocha for success.

As I watched him pull away from the curb, I thanked Hashem for giving me children who care enough about His children to know that sometimes serving Him means even driving on Shabbos.

As Shaya turned the corner, I turned to Shul.

As I walked I wondered which one of us was the one to emulate: the rabbi on his way to Shul or the rabbi’s son on his way to find a lost Jew.

If Not Now, Then When? ~ Hillel

Indeed. It was clearly Rachel’s time to reunite with Hashem, but even many who did not have the chance to know her – like me – are feeling her loss. RIP, Miss Rachel … May your family and friends find comfort in the loving embrace of Our Creator and may you find eternal joy at Hashem’s right hand.

Laws making it illegal to feed homeless in 33 cities must be reversed

not crime to feed homelessOn HuffPo, Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz writes about the 90 year old man arrested for feeding the homeless: “Arnold Abbott in Fort Lauderdale was arrested twice for publicly helping feed the vulnerable in his community.” And adds:

Astonishingly, according to the National Coalition for the Homeless, 33 American cities passed new restrictions on feeding the homeless between January 2013-April 2014.

Jews are commanded against following these laws, since we are obligated to feed and tend to the most vulnerable in our midst. The Shulchan Aruch writes:

If someone comes and says, “feed me,” you don’t check him to see if he is an imposter, but you feed him right away. If there is a naked person who comes and says, “give me clothing,” you check him to see if he is an imposter. And if you know him, you give him clothing right away (Yoreh Deah, Laws of Tzedakah, 251:10).

A News.Mic article makes a good case for the fact that that, “Essentially, (the laws are) designed to make being homeless within city limits so unpleasant that the downtrodden have no choice but to leave.” And points out, “In 2011, more than 20 members of Food Not Bombs were arrested in Orlando for sharing food.”

Rabbi Yanklowitz points out:

49,000 homeless veterans on any given night, although the National Council for Homeless Veterans estimates that an additional 1.4 million veterans are at risk of becoming homelessness due to poverty and a lack of support networks. These are among the people who we are now forbidden to feed?

…Unfortunately, it was left to English actor/activist Russell Brand to put things in sarcastic perspective: “America just had midterm elections where $4 billion was spent on campaigning… But feeding the homeless? That’s illegal.”

And urges a movement to repeal the ban against feeding our nation’s homeless:

From Henry David Thoreau to Martin Luther King, America has a strong tradition of objecting and even defying laws that violate core spiritual values in manners most egregious. It is not adequate to provide meager soup kitchens that one must travel to. Many need more and find themselves so desperate that they are begging in the streets. We must respond compassionately. This law must be repealed, and the Jewish people need be at the forefront of this call to action.

ACTIONS!

How-to safely enjoy drinking on Purim

Be wellOnce a year on Purim, Jews celebrate our deliverance from annihilation in Persia and just for this holiday, it’s OK for Jews to drink enough to become tipsy. Comedian Sol Auerbach shares good advice on how to enjoy the pleasant effects of an alcohol buzz without causing bodily harm to yourself – tips that are good for any occasion when people are imbibing spirits. Thanks Sol!

In a nutshell: drink a lot of water to stay hydrated, eat and stop if you begin to feel woozy. Here’s Saul’s complete list:

Enjoy alcohol drinks on Purim without getting sick, hungover, or worse

  1. Water: Follow every drink (or every two drinks) with at least one full cup of water.
    This will keep your body hydrated and seriously reduce your chances of passing out, getting sick/hungover, or G-d forbid ending up in a hospital.

    Dehydration is one of the main causes of hangover symptoms and drinking water along with any alcoholic beverage can prevent those symptoms. Drinking a cup of water before you start drinking alcohol, and after every drink (or every two drinks) will go a long way towards relieving hangover discomfort.

    DON’T drink a whole lot of alcohol and wait until you need to throw up until you finally drink some water. Wherever you go, bring at least 2 bottles of water with you and follow every 1 or 2 drinks with at least 5 ounces of water.

  2. ONLY drink on a full stomach or after eating a substantial amount of food.
    Drinking on an empty stomach is simply dangerous. Most people don’t realize that drinking alcohol on an empty stomach should be avoided because it leads more quickly to intoxication. Neither do they realize what a big difference drinking with food in the stomach can really make. For example, Swedish researchers had a group of people consume a few drinks after an overnight fast. The next day they had the group consume the same amount of alcohol in the same amount of time after eating a modest breakfast. After having breakfast, the group had a much lower average blood alcohol level — only 75% of the BAC reached when drinking on an empty stomach.

    Eating food – especially proteins, fats and dense carbohydrates – slows down the intoxication rate, as does drinking slowly.

    Don’t drink too fast, too much at once, and don’t chug. Chugging is very dangerous because it leads to faster intoxication as the alcohol is absorbed directly into the bloodstream and neutralizes the body’s ability to reject the toxin by vomiting.

    If youre fasting on Taanis Esther then avoid getting drunk Purim night. Save it for Purim day time.

  3. Drink Moderately! This bears repeating.
    If you do not drink to the point of total intoxication, your chances of vomiting or getting sick/hungover is very slim. Although there are exceptions, generally only people who drink to excess will experience sickness.

    DON’T play the game of, “I know what I could handle.” Play the game of, “I know when to stop.”

    Some days our bodies are not able to handle the same amount of alcohol as it has on prior days. Just because you were able to handle X amount of drinks at previous parties and situations, this IN NO WAY indicates you will be able to handle that same amount of alcohol.

    The number one reason people end up hospitalized for drinking too much is because they had previously drank the same amount of alcohol without having any problems and so did it again. The same way you can’t handle the same amount of food or soda every day, you can’t handle the same amount of alcohol each time you drink. Regardless of how much or little you drank, as soon as you feel any symptoms of drunkenness (slight head-aches, dizziness, nausea, needing to vomit etc), stop drinking alcohol IMMEDIATELY and drink some water.

Purim Sameach!