The Census Bureau is hiring now – and it pays well

Looking for a work opportunity that pays fair wages?

  • The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting people to work on the 2020 Census – right now.
  • Thousands of employees are needed to work in the communities where they live.
  • These are temporary, part-time and full-time positions.
  • Hourly wage is $18 an hour for Enumerator/Lister; Census Field Supervisors are at $20 an hour.
  • Mileage is reimbursed at $0.58 per mile.
  • No experience or educational requirement is necessary.
  • The website to apply is 2020census.gov/jobs. You must apply online.
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    Gerrymandering helped the GOP win big – so they seek to expand their advantage by sabotaging 2020 Census

    The Census in the Constitution

    Bill Moyers points out, “the Census is key to the work (of) researchers and journalists,” so hobbling the Census’ data collection process will hobble the ability of independent analysts to examine the realities of American life and to tell accurate and authoritative stories about it. Furthermore, funding to serve Americans is allocated according to the composition of neighborhoods and households – and these characteristics are established through the Census.

    And by the way, did you know that the U.S. Census is required in our Constitution?


    Marquette University archivist William Fliss tells how census data shows the transformation of the United States from a new republic to the nation it is today.

    Slate shares a short synopsis of the Census’ importance in terms of services for Americans:

    The decennial census is critical to ensuring that Americans are fairly represented in Washington, since it’s used as the basis for congressional redistricting. A mishandled census could undercount poor and minority populations, putting some states and many cities at a demographic disadvantage…

    The best description of the Census’ importance comes, naturally, from the Census Bureau website (at least until Trump removes it):

    The U.S. Census counts every resident in the United States. It is mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution and takes place every 10 years. The data collected by the decennial census determine the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives and is also used to distribute billions in federal funds to local communities.

    The 2010 Census represented the most massive participation movement ever witnessed in our country. Approximately 74 percent of the households returned their census forms by mail; the remaining households were counted by census workers walking neighborhoods throughout the United States. National and state population totals from the 2010 Census were released on December 21, 2010. Redistricting data, which include additional state, county and local counts, will be released starting in February 2011.

    “The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent term of 10 years, in such manner as they shall by Law direct.”

    ~ Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution of the United States

    Gerrymandering is what has allowed elections to be skewed toward Republican control

    That bit about Census data driving the way election districts are drawn and how many Congressional Representative each state gets: is actually the reason why Republicans have recently acquired increasing control over Congress even during Democratic presidencies.

    Bill Moyers’ David Daley opened up discussion about the power of gerrymandering in August 2016.

    For all of the misleading nonsense about “rigged elections” coming from the Trump camp this summer, we haven’t talked enough about the way our electoral map really was rigged by Republicans after the 2010 census. These tilted (gerrymandered) maps make it possible for the Republicans to govern with a supermajority in Ohio, North Carolina and Wisconsin – despite getting less votes overall.

    The WaPo elaborates:

    How do conservative Republicans maintain so much power in the House, even though Americans reelected a liberal president and polls show that the GOP suffers from high disapproval ratings?

    Salon editor David Daley’s punchy, though overstated, new book lays the blame for Republican power in the House on partisan gerrymandering, the byzantine process through which state legislatures draw district lines to favor incumbents from one party. Challenging the claim that increased partisan polarization is a result of voters naturally sorting themselves into red and blue states, Daley argues that a group of operatives in the Republican Party did the sorting for them. The GOP poured money into an unprecedented effort to control governorships and state legislative bodies in 2010 and to then redraw congressional districts so that the party could turn the House into a firewall against the Democrats.

    While the term “gerrymander” has been around since the early years of the republic, computer technology and big money have allowed governors and legislatures to perfect the process in ways that have never before been imagined, according to Daley. The same technology that allows Amazon to figure out who buys what in any home on a given block now allows party officials to do the same with elections.

    Although his argument might not be as sexy as talking about how money corrupts politics or how the 24-hour news media leaves us all screaming, the success of Republican legislatures and governors at redrawing congressional districts is the reason, he says, House Republican incumbents have increased their power and don’t have to worry about any “wave” election that would shift control to the other party.

    So now: Why did the Census Bureau’s director quit?

    Sabotage is probably the reason Census Bureau Director John Thompson resigned today on 11 May 2017. He probably looked at the writing on the wall and understood that the Trump administration has little intention of allowing a fair, impartial and complete Census of the American people to be held this cycle. Slate share some of the ways the sabotage is being carried out:

  • To make matters worse, the administration has reportedly toyed with the idea of adding a question to the once-a-decade survey about immigration status, which some experts believe could scare many households out of responding.
  • Congress (just) handed the census an appropriation “that critics say is woefully inadequate.”
  • Thompson also testified to Congress last week that a snazzy new electronic data collection system that was meant to save expenses would cost 50 percent more than expected.
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    Protected: Tell the Census Bureau: Help inmate’s families get the aid the deserve and need

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